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as solicitor general. nine years ago, they ruled 5 to 4 to uphold the university of michigan law schools limited use of affirmative action. and coming up next on c-span, oral arguments from last week's opening session of the courts full term. this case asks whether courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits and forge human rights abuses that occurred out -- for human rights abuses that occurred outside the country. this is an hour. >> we'll hear argument first this term in case 10-1491, kiobel v. royal dutch petroleum. mr. hoffman? >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, the plaintiffs in this case received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss.
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
panels and between the patient and doctor. that is something i do not agree with in our health-care law. that's one of the reasons i oppose it. these are times we have to look at what is best for everyone to have the best kind of health care they can have. i believe in preventive health care and let me just address one thing before -- let me digress for a second. i have never said i'm for privatizing social security or our medicare plans. that's clearly not my thing. congressman murphy knows that has to be honest about that. i will support continuing reform to social security and medicare simply prolong it for our generation. congressman murphy voted to take $716 billion of medicare to fund the affordable health care act. i don't think that is what we should do. we're there for than going to eventually did i those services to our seniors or hospitals or doctors who are going to take medicare patients. . it is being taken out of the pockets of drug industries and drug companies who are making billions of care for seniors. if you are going to be serious about reducing the rate of growth o
still need this law. that is really unfortunate. host: willie in jacksonville, florida. independent. caller: good morning. with the lady that just called -- my thing is there must not be enough highly educated black institutions for black folks to keep saying i have to go to harvard to get my education, to stanford or something like that. i just do not understand. being black, we do not have the professors, at least the same criteria. to me, it seems like we are no further than we were before. we're still trying to get an education at your school. 500 years, and we do not have no qualified school on the same level with these schools and professors that is on the same level? see what i'm saying? host: here is bill powers, the 28 president of the university of texas, writing in today's "wall street journal." "history repeats itself wednesday in an eerie but ironic way." host: in the opinion in 2003 that adam liptak referred to, that justice sandra day o'connor wrote that the constitution -- host: that is sandra day o'connor, writing back in 2003. from rockville center, new york, a rep
law even one that must seem in our short-term interest to do so because of a long-term the goals of those who think international law means anything are those who want to restrain the united states. this is another adviser to gov. romney. i say this not to make a partisan statement, but to say it is different. we spent years and enter the bush years talking about an imperial role for the united states. empire means you have a power about the role. it makes rules for everybody else. that is just not what this world is of central my view. it will never work. i think within a united states that can solve its domestic problems and recapture a sense that it is an example worth emulating, there is -- although they are not nearly as strong as we would like them to be, there is health and strength in the multinational system. >> to talk a lot about continuity. if he set aside the past 50 years, the longest extended continuous strain in the international outlook, staying out of the world. it was looking after our own problems. it is taking advantage of the fact that the atlantic and the p
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
to the -- for the middle-class families. that is why i passed the connecticut's them sell law, which is saving lives and the people to work. i went to congress to stand for manufacturing and fight outsourcing. that is me. that is my story. it is a very different story from the demands. over and over again, she has shown as she stands up for herself and her profits at the expense of the people that work for her and at the expense of this state. i will stand for only one thing, the middle class of this state. i look forward to the next hour. >> our first question to mr. murphy. >> both of you have had personal financial problems. mr. murphy, you have been sued for nonpayment of mortgage bills. mrs. mcmahon committee filed for bankruptcy and walked away from that. how can connecticut voters felt confident that you will be able to exercise good judgment on the federal budgets -- federal budget decisions facing connecticut taxpayers when you have mismanaged your own personal finances? >> thank you for this question. as i said, i have made mistakes in my own personal finances. but i made those mistakes an
because labor rolls -- rules. it is the epa and the laws. >> regulation. >> it is not just uncertainty. it is fear of the worst-case scenario coming down the pike. the worst-case scenario is that you do not do with this and their unbalanced tax system. you let the regulatory regime continue to squelch entrepreneurs. you don't take seriously our long-term energy needs and demands and create an affordable and reliable supply of north american energy. >> you fly right off the fiscal cliff. >> it was a shocking experience for a lot of people to go back a few months. the first time we hit the debt ceiling, all the seven whether you were a lender or somebody here who is proud of the way this country had managed to fair, all the sudden policy makers are running right at to the edge. you cannot pay your bills. there is nobody in business that would be allowed to walk away like that. what we're saying is that people in charge of both parties said it takes leadership and the execs -- in the executive branch. it takes leadership. the decisions have to be made. i see governors in both parties have
rights, equal citizenship, under the law. we have a mission. we must call for this spirit. more than ever before there is an urgency now. some folks might be wary because the road to freedom has never been an easy one. some folks have scars on their backs. some folks have been that still aches in their soul. we cannot stop. james baldwin said that human history is a perpetual testament to the achievement of the impossible dream of america must drive us forward. we must not fail now. when other people want to drive us, we must be the hope. when people drive us to doubt, we must be the fate. i learned this from my family and my parents and my grandparents that one folks tried to tell you if you are lesser when one person stand up straight and strong, and they lived an entire nation. [applause] when one person defiantly refuses to be relegated to second class, we are all elevated. this is what everybody must understand. you cannot deny the right of freedom and liberty of others without diminishing your own. this is what we must understand. what king said from a jail cell rings true for all o
point it will go too far. some of these are laws written in basel. they are written for other people and other purposes. they say we have to have a common ground and make it fair for everyone. i agree with that concept except that it's bad for america. if we're not going to do it, the rest of the world cannot make us. >> what about the poster issue of proprietary trading, the volcker rule, all of that? where did you come out on that? >> after dodd-frank, the blueprint, the white paper, and never went through in their two cents, i would argue that was completely unnecessary. it was not the problem. we supported a lot of dodd- frank. you are either for or against it. there are like 2000 things in dodd-frank. the volcker rule had anything to do with the crisis. it is something that he felt deeply about. keep trading safe for big financial companies? i agree. we need to get rid of too big to fail. i agree with the intent. we do not do any crop trading. we have the widest, deepest, most transparent capital market in the world. that's not throw the baby out with the bathwater. the struggle
that the university of michigan law school, where they did use race in admission, had a lower level of -- they considered 14% to be a critical mass, much less than what the university of texas achieved through race-neutral means. i think this goes a long way to explaining why most observers think the supreme court is likely to strike down the use of race at the university of texas. the second question we take up, what should replace race-based affirmative action if it in fact is struck down by the u.s. supreme court? in a report, we look at nine states where, because of voter initiative or executive order or legislation, universities -- they did not give up on diversity and tried to find other ways of achieving racial and ethnic diversity. these plans were hardly perfect, but in many ways there are better than the old style of race-based affirmative action. you can see that in our analysis, six state street -- six states created partnerships with disadvantaged by schools to increase the pipeline of low- income and minority students. seven of the states provide class-based admission
campaign finance should be regulated, the current state of affairs is that the law is unclear and no one knows if the decisions will stand or get knocked down. it is insane, the wild west. it bodes poorly for us to understand what powers are at work. it is worth mentioning the stock act recently passed which will have new information for us to sink our teeth into a realm financial disclosures. financial transactions have to be disclosed monthly. there are certain things in their we worry about. that is a whole nother set of information. the third thing i want to mention is how political power functions. , the structure of the political dialogue. right now it is a mess. this is not the rules committee fault. in ways it is obama's fault. this is something to think about as you think about how the house works and what kind of tools we should build on the outside. when i look at the different categories of congressional information, it to the things we worked hard on, one is taking advantage of political pressures that exist. nonprofits would love to be able to create political pressure. we
and enforcement of environmental laws, the ban on the xl pipeline, the enforcement of labor laws -- those policies have killed thousands and thousands of jobs and collectively, we are making it incredibly difficult for small businesses to thrive, much less survive. >> so if you have 65% of spending going to individual payments, what would you do to try to reduce that? >> in order to create more jobs, we have to control the national debt. i think that is what we have to do. i have said it from the beginning. i have given a plan to try to deal with it. this idea that somehow mr. cruz is lecturing us on standing on our own feet, i find incredible. he spent most of your adult life working for the government. you have not created jobs. you have not on your own business. i have. my wife and i own a retail store. we did not have the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective mem
in his campaign. he has been raising pac may, too. what you have to do is comply with the laws as they are, whether you're paying taxes were you are playing a football game. whether you like those laws are not, you comply with them. i have been for campaign reform and have pushed it very hard. i believe we have to do some things in that regard. but i have noticed that the senator of indiana has opposed the campaign reform and voted repeatedly against it. the things we have to do, i believe, that will cut back on soft money, for example, which i look on as frankly one of those things that we have had to do because the republicans have done it for so long. i think it is a loophole, frankly. but campaign reform, changing the rules of the game, is something that we tried repeatedly in this session of the congress, but only to have the republicans' lead the charge against the ndp does. i respect senator quayle would change his mind on that piece of legislation and give us the kind of campaign reform law that i think is needed in america. >> senator quayle, your response. >> senator
for a second that a new set of laws were passed. as quickly as they are passed coming election lawyers figure out how to get around them. it is remarkable. what i support getting the money back into the candidates' campaigns? absolutely. i have worked for two million politicians in my life. the rank-and-file should be approaching somebody who is self-funding to be able to raise larger amounts. but i think there should be far more accountability for the electorate and far more transparency. from my perspective, i think it is better for the country if we went back to that model. >> i don't know that i necessarily agree with the assumption of the question. if you saw the american crossroads ad in which you see the groups do. should the elected representeive do what he thinks is right or what the electorate thinks is right? the important thing to take away from that is the there is this tension between what the elected representative wants to do and with the electorate wants to do. no one wants to run for office to cast a lever. you want to run because you believe in something. nobody wants to ju
, charles -- i referenced the religious freedom restoration act. it was a law passed virtually unanimously by congress, signed by president clinton in 1993 in order to restore the scope of religious freedom that had existed. it was struck down as applied to the states in 1997 but still applied to the federal government. i think we have already had two earlier decisions from district court on the merits of that, both of them involving private for-profit plaintiffs, and the issue is split just among those first two courts. there are procedural issues because of the ongoing regulatory process that might create a sort of interim step, but that actually is probably going to get resolved between now and august 1, 2013. the administrative process will be done, and the courts will invariably go straight to the merits, and you will start to get married decisions uniformly by the end of next year. >> does that depend on what the administration does and who wins and all that? >> not really. what the administration has put into play by virtue of the regulatory process is a relatively limited piece of
bracket normally pays 23%. is there something wrong with our tax laws that requires such large deductions of taxes for wealthy people? >> they reported federal taxes, state and local taxes. it gives people a fairer picture. that year i happened to pay a lot of state and local taxes, which, as you know, are deducted from the other. i looked it up the other day, and we paid, i think it's 342% of our gross income in taxes. s >> we did a little looking around to see about his. we can't find his 1981 tax return. it may have been released. maybe my bonet knows whether he released it. we did find his income is $1.4 million, and i think he paid the same as i did in taxes. he also made a reference that troubled me very much. he started talking about my chauffeur. you know, i'm driven to work by the secret service. so is mrs. ferraro, so is mr. mondale's. they saved the life of the president of the united states. i thought that was a cheap shot telling the american people to try to divide class, rich and poor. but the big question, it isn't whether mrs. ferraro is doing well. i think they are depog
but they encouraged that everybody would vote. now understand that under the new voter i.d. laws, i was told that in some cases, they are shifting id's from people who don't have an expiration date. i retired in 1991 and i have had the same id card for 21 years. guest: sergeant major, thank you for your service. i served on active duty the same time you did. i retired in 2004 and i joined in 1984. i am revealing my age now -- there are voting assistance officers on every duty station. if you are working in the battalion headquarters or company headquarters, you might be aware of who that is. i was a logistics marine which meant i was driving a tractor trailers, served the infantry, hold all over the state of california or in open now, japan and did massive field time. i had no awareness of who the voting assistance officer was, what my deadlines were to get registered to vote. there was no awareness or training. i think everybody and acted to the can agree that there are opportunities in the military to do mandatory training. everybody knows taxes are due on april 15. we set up tax centers o
the law they are required to do that. i am delighted to see that the administration is following the law. [applause] >> excuse me, this will be out of my time, not yours, knowing and cherishing the people of this city and knowing their restraint and different dense -- diffidence, i bee seach -- i beseach you, try to hold your applause, please. >> i have to comment on the comment the vice president made. if you take af d.c. , food stamps, go down the line on poor people's programs, those are the programs that suffered considerably under a different administration, first budget cuts, and those are the ones in the second part of their terms, we were able to restore some of those terribly unfair cuts to the poor people of this country. >> vice president bush. >> maybe we can have experts go to the books. they will do it anyway. spending for foods food stamps is way, way up under the reagan administration. af d.c. is up under the reagan administration. and i am not going to be found wrong on that. i am sure on my facts. we are trying to help, and i think we are doing a reasonable job. we are
studies election law, it is great to be in a state where you see presidential candidates campaigning. because of our electoral college system, most of the country nowadays, it is a small number of states that get virtually all of the attention. we are either the beneficiaries are the victims, depending on your perspective. you cannot turn on the television in ohio without seeing a campaign advertisement, including many presidential advertisements, without being hit by a motorcade. in your station, channel 10, at 5:30 in the morning there is a six minute commercial break and in those minutes six different commercial ads ran. at what point is there a law of diminishing returns? guest: if your campaign has the money, you cannot go quiet. i think he would be at a disadvantage, if they go dark. more importantly, to answer the question, the vote in ohio is today, this week. these candidates are doing everything that they can, restructuring to some degree. mitt romney and the president talking directly to the camera, making their appeal. i think that dan is right. this is one of five states
here today. to my left is christopher swift. he is a fellow at the center for national security law at the university of virginia law school. he holds a bachelor's degree in government and history. a ph.d. in politics in international studies from cambridge university. he is the author of an upcoming book. most recently, he did field research in yemen, which he will be talking about today. he has served in the u.s. treasury department. thank you very much. we are pleased to have you, as well. without further ado, let me turn to peter bergen for his comments and insights. >> thank you for the introduction. i wanted to talk about the american foundation in terms of drones. [sirens] can everybody hear me? 2004 was really the first drone strike in pakistan, authorized by george w. bush. not a single drone strike has occurred outside the areas. that is one of the reasons i think he used the acquiescence in the strikes. i think there is acquiescence by the pakistan government. it would very quickly change if the drone strikes changed and other tribal regions. they are referred to as forei
is saying although they passed the budget in the house which did not become law, which cut 19%, in this rating education, he said that is not a cut, it is just a smaller increase. i want to tell that all to your parents when they no longer take at $2,500 tax credit next year if they were to win. tell that to the kids who were kicked off early education. folks come on taxes, if you go back and take a look, paul rye and saying his budget really is not a budget cut is like governor romney standing on employment lines and saying to a guy, i did not outsource your job, i off toward it. that is the distinction they make. when i point out that governor romney, a great businessman, did bain way, and outsource jobs, they said that is not what he is doing. when i pointed out that the governor and, as governor as massachusetts, sent a call service that people in massachusetts would pick up the phone and call to see whether or not they are entitled to unemployment benefits, they got somebody in asia. they outsourced that. imagine the ideas, the feeling of a guy calling, saying, how bought
prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the definition be changed. it was, we succeeded. mrs. mrs. mrs. has always been ahead of the main stream news when it comes to coverage of women and girls. "ms." first sounded the alarm about the war on women eight years ago. behind me you'll recognize the cover of "ms.," wonder woman fighting for peace and justice. for our 40th anniversary we wanted to feature this iconic super hero with women marching to stop the attacks
accessibility for insurance. we need affordability for insurance. this current law is not going to do that. it will continue to drive up health-care costs and the cost of insurance premiums. >> you have 90 seconds. >> let me tell you why -- why i have dedicated my life to the idea that everyone should have access to decent health care. there's a woman in connecticut who has worked hard all her life and so has her husband. her husband was switching jobs and in between those two jobs, during the week he was unemployed, their son was diagnosed with cancer. when it would to get insurance on her husband's new plan, they would not provide for because he had a pre-existing condition. one week or two weeks of a lifetime and they didn't have insurance. they lost everything. they lost their house, their savings, they became destitute simply because an illness happened at the wrong time. there is no repeal and replace plan. republicans in washington have voted to repeal is built 33 times that have never offered a replacement. we'd to protect this bill and perfected going forward. matters for small bu
on these matters. i do like virginia's laws based on freedom and disclosure. and if there was more freedom, more of the contributions would come to the campaigns. what i would like to see in any ads that are run, whether run by candidates or independent groups, including the ones that are running negative ads that are false and misleading about me, is honesty. tim has brought up this issue of pay. and he's running these ads saying that, quote, he's setting a positive example by cutting his pay as governor. and he attacks the owner. attacked me today again on it. let me give you the truthful facts and you be the judge. as governor day one i returned 10% of my salary. all four years. mark warner followed up after me a few years later and cut his by 20%. what did tim do? he didn't cut his pay at all. when he came in, he could have found followed mark warner or my example but it was well into second year as governor he cut it by just 5%. so i was the one who actually set the positive example, tim, that you followed by you did do it half heartedly. and as far as in the senate, in the senate i returne
worse. but don't dismiss the old framework lightly. credit for the 1986 reform law belongs to democrats like bill bradley in the senate. just as much as to president reagan. as a member of the house back then, i not only voted for it, but i whipped the votes to make sure it passed. i was on the committee set up by dan rostenkowski to get it done. the approach made a good deal of sense at the time. then, as now, the code was littered with egregious loopholes that needed to be reformed. recall the so-called passive law schools that were in place back then. they allowed wealthy taxpayers to gain the system. someone could invest in a bowling alley and then, if the bowling alley lost money, they could take a write off many times larger than their initial money incestment of their entire income tax liability. we need to get rid of such a gimmicky tax shelter. paring these loopholes allowed us to cut rates. at the time, that made sense, too. while it is critically important to insure that everyone, especially those at the top pay their fair share, 50% of the top federal tax rate is what we had
storm. i am a criminal defense attorney for 19 years. i started off my law firm in 2007 and i employ 11 full-time people at my firm. i know what it is like to run a small business. we have strayed far from the principles of limited government. our government taxes and spends out of control and our civil liberties are constantly under attack. we can fix it, but we need to get government back into its cage. >> our final opening statement is from jeff flake. >> good to be here. two days ago, cheryl and i received a wonderful phone call from my son ryan and forming as we are grandparents. aidan was born into a wonderful family, but he was born into $50,000 of debt. his share of the federal debt we all hold. that is why the stakes in this election are so high. we have to have somebody who understands fiscal discipline. that has been my record in the house of representatives, where i fought my own leadership on issues like earmarks. they punish me for it, but i kept at it and we do not have earmarks any more. that is the kind of attitude i will take to the united states senate. my opponent ha
passed the ryan budget through the house of representatives, which did not become law, he drastically cut across the board 19%, in eviscerating education and so many other things. he said, no, no, that is not a cut. he said it is a smaller increase. i want to tell that all to your parents when they don't take a $2,500 tax credit next year if they win could tell that to the two hundred thousand kids who will be kicked off of early education. on taxes and make you go back and look, paul ryan is saying his budget really is not a budget cut. that is like governor romney standing in an unemployment line and say, i did not outsource your job, i offshore it. that is the distinction they make. [applause] when i point out that governor romney, who is a great businessman, did the bain way, the lowest wages, the cheapest community that you can find, and then move there, offshore, outsourced jobs, they came back and said, no, no, that is not what he is doing. when i pointed out that the governor even, as governor of massachusetts, sent a call service that people in massachusetts could pick up the pho
blocked those exceptions. now, these guys pledged that they are going to defund planned parenthood. by law, it cannot perform abortions. after last night, if you have any doubt about the caliber and the philosophy of the justices they would appoint to the supreme court, i imagine they are pretty well past. can you imagine the next president is likely to have almost one probably two supreme court appointees. roe v. wade is hanging. do you think there are going to appoint justices to the court that will not join scalia and others to overrule roe v. wade? single most consequential decision a president makes other than going to war is the appointment to the supreme court, because those appointments live long after any president is gone. ladies and gentlemen, congressman ryan voted against the lily ledbetter act. all it did was -- it sounds ridiculous, but it only gives a woman a cause of action if she finds she was cheated in her employment. the statute of limitations did not prevent her from bringing cheated.hen she was she i we're pushing hard for a fair pay act. i happen to think my daughte
of market and media could act as a surveillance tool for law enforcement -- law enforcement and public health officials. is it possible we could integrate accreditation with in this form of marketing? that is a larger question to ask. facebook's terms and conditions say you cannot be an online pharmacy on facebook on bless you are certified, but we do not know what that certification requires, and our site is still up. and cooperation. if this is a surveillance methods, you should be providing this information to the manufacturers, chief public health officials, and law enforcement to actively follow up. i will and the presentation. if you want more information, you can contact myself. i do not know if we have enough time for questions. we would be happy to take them. i want to thank the partnership for safe medicine for their support and a professor and the institute of health studies and all his leadership in our particular research. thank you very much. [applause] >> i have a softball question. hopefully. one of the things you mentioned about social media, we have four or five diffe
around, at it means the government. it includes congress, state department, law enforcement, intelligence community. it is not a single point of failure. some people do not like the answer. your issue about funding is exactly right. state department funding did not cause the death of these americans. state department underfunding has been an issue brought before congress multiple years. it has transcended administrations. you are exactly right. host: diana's from utah, republican line. caller: as i listened to your guest and he answered my question about hillary clinton and what role she is going to play. is it going to affect her future? thank you. guest: i am not a political analyst so they would be hard for me to address this. we have to look at hillary clinton's role as the secretary of state. she has done a very good job on behalf of the united states representing our government overseas. we cannot lose sight of that. at the end of the day, it demands transparency and attention. how she handles this is going to drive a lot of how she is perceived. we will have to see in the next 30-6
for being here. thank you to ucon. this is special. we met each other at the law school. that is as dramatic as it gets for kathy and i. let's talk about this. protecting manufacturing is critical to protecting this stage. i do have a jobs plan. linda mcmahon to stop saying i don't. manufacturing is the heart of it. the buy-american caucus stands for this. our taxpayer dollars should be used to fund jobs here in suspe. it relies heavily on manufacturing. >> you have talked quite a bit about your track record of creating jobs as a business owner. as a u.s. venture, how would you create jobs that >> i do have a six. plan. he does not have a plan. it cuts taxes on businesses so they're competitive. it rolls back regulations. it cut spending 1%. it empowers our work force. it calls for a comprehensive leadership policy that will continue to drill for natural gas while we develop our renewable. i do have a, 3 pence live -- have a comprehensive 6poin point plan. aleksei of 30 seconds for rebuttal. >> this is made up. i have a jobs record. this idea to try to trivialize it, talk to the workers who
force, what goes above and beyond normal law enforcement oriented security. these individuals were familiar and cared larger caliber better weapons and the tactics they employed would be the counter military style attack. >> thank you. >> ambassador kennedy, i want to make sure i clarify one of the most controversial parts of this matter and that is how the public first learned of the first reason given for the disturbances in benghazi. now i understand that the state department did not take any position, including the position taken by ambassador rice, so i think it's important to trace how the ambassador came poth conclusions that she reported on television. she said that her information was that the benghazi matters were similar to the protests that had arisen in cairo and she refered to extremist elements, tunistic elements taking advantage of that protest. now the director of the office of national intelligence issued a statement that indicated thatted the been the source of the ambassador's statement. and i'd like to read what the national intelligence director said. in the i
attorney for 19 years. i started off my law firm in 2007 and i employ 11 full-time people at my firm. i know what it is like to run a small business. we have strayed far from the principles of limited government. our government taxes and spends out of control and our civil liberties are constantly under attack. we can fix it, but we need to get government back into its cagae. >> our final opening statement is from jeff flake. >> good to be here. two days ago, cheryl and i received a wonderful phone call from my son syan and forming as we are grandparents. aidan was born into a wonderful family, but he was born into $50,000 of debt. his share of the federal debt we all hold. that is why the stakes in this election are so high. we have to have somebody who understands fiscal discipline. that has been my record in the house of representatives, where i fought my own leadership on issues like earmarks. they punish me for it, but i kept at it and we do not have earmarks any more. that is the kind of attitude i will take to the united states senate. my opponent have a great rÉsume a. but a gr
. women get paid. there are equal-pay laws. i'm rebutting, if i might. >> every physician -- >> dr. ruiz, let her finish. congresswoman, please. >> the people are concerned about security, they're concerned about national security. they're concerned about domestic security. they want to know they can pay their bills. the lilly led dth better pay act was strictly out of nancy pelosi. you didn't answer the question if you would vote for nancy pelosi or not. we know the answer. >> we could go on for hours clearly, but unfortunately the hour is quickly coming to a close many time now for the last words from our candidates. dr. ruiz, you're up first. >> thanks again to "the desert sun" for hosting this debate and a special thanks to those of you who devoted time to watching it. engaged and informed voters are so essential to a successful democracy. as candidates we owe it to you to tell you who we are and where we differ. the freedom to disagree and speak our mind is the most american of traditions and values. but there is a big difference between disagreeing and character assassination. cong
the congress and the president today from passing a law that would require full and timely disclosure of contributions to these superpacs and others. the supreme court scission did not do that. they are working for themselves and their party. what we need is campaign finance reform. i will give you a simple principle, that the people who can contribute directly or indirectly are people who can vote. news flash -- corporations and unions cannot vote. it is a simple principle, one of the ones we are exposing to the public, and they overwhelmingly endorsed it. most of these areas -- it is very common sense. that is what the american people respond to. that is not how our politicians treat us. that is part of the problem. >> don't you think it is interesting in all of these really tough times, we have talked all about these big numbers, that the house, the sense, and the white house did not reduce their salaries? think about it. >> do you think they should? >> if you were in business, you would have to. they need to set the first example of making the cut back for themselves. >> leading b
served as deputy counsel that -- he has a law degree from the university of chicago. >> an impressive background. have you been lobbied by anyone who you have -- used to work with? >> no i have not. >> most of the people who comment on the public record spend a lot of time -- what are you going to do personally that your opinion is informed with what is happening with the average consumer? >> every confirmation hearing, i stated that i would hold no favor our prejudice with any particular company or segment of the industry. i would like to think that i have had privileged serving at the fcc and has stayed true to it -- true to that. a number have been with public interest groups, even individuals. when i go outside of washington to visit various places, and make a point of visiting citizens who have not been involved in the communications industry, but by decisions that we have had to make. i heard from citizens in kansas about different communications issues that affected them. it is a good way to stay grounded, as it were. it is too easy to think about these things as abstractions o
of a casino operation and we will break you up by law. [applause] now look friends, there will be some people who say this is all too radical, let's just carry in as we are. i say we can't carry on as we are. we can't carry on as we are, two nations not one. the banks and the rest of britain. we must have a one nation banking system as part of a one nation economy. next, we need an education system that works for all young people. you see, to be a one nation economy you have got to use all the talents of all of our young people. it's not just that it's socially right, it is absolutely essential for our economy for the future. i remember when chris and i were at haverstock. i remember at haverstock school, my comprehensive, the kids who were good at passing exams, who were academic, they could go to university and the world would just open up for them like it did for me. but think about all those kids who had talent and ability, great talent and ability. school just didn't offer them enough. it was true twenty five years ago, and it is even more true today. just think in your minds eye about t
with that. the trouble, of course, is the antitrust law can hardly keep up with what is going on in the marketplace. it is really difficult. i really do think in the next administration congress is the one that is going to be driving some of these things. conversely, on the science and innovation side, i think a big difference is that there is a real commitment to public- private partnerships by the obama administration, looking at ways to can have collaborative process with increasingly fierce competitors abroad. those experiments are pretty well full blown through different initiatives, emphasizing the regional capabilities of the u.s. economy. different parts of the country, different industries, places where we are really strong, places where we need to be stronger. it really is trying to find that bridge between basic research and development and the financing to get things commercialize. it is experimenting, trying to find those ways. is really different from what the romney campaign -- the romney campaign has not really talked about this at all. is really private sector
into law to deal with the nation's rising debt load -- the fiscal commission not, came up with a plan, and it essentially went nowhere because they did not get enough votes from the panel to spark the next stage with these legislative actions. so, a group of six senators started meeting privately, sometimes in secret, to try to see if there was something big to do with this framework. these are very big political and policy decisions. they are very complex. they take a lot of political will at a time when congress does not seem to have that kind of will. these six, perhaps they could come up with something. they have been meeting for two years. they added two members. we could go through the list. the republican side -- senator sexy chambliss, senator mike crapo, -- senator chambliss, senator mike crapo, tom coburn of oklahoma, and and and the democratic side is mark warner, kent conrad, durbin of illinois, who is the number two democrat, and a since added to the list, senator michael bennett from colorado, who is a newer, younger member who is part of the generation that does not und
worse. but don't dismiss the old framework lightly. credit for the 1986 reform law begone -- belongs to democrats like bill bradley and the senate. just as much as to president reagan. as a member of the house back then, not only voted for it, fight with the votes to make sure it passed. i was on the committee set up by dan rostenkowski to get it done. the approach but a good deal of sense at the time. then as now, the code was littered with agrees is loopholes that needed to be reform. recall the so-called passive loss schools that were in place but then. they allowed wealthy taxpayers to gain the system. someone could invest in a bowling alley and then, if the bullets lost money, they could take a ride up many times larger than their initial money and what of their entire income tax liability. we need to get rid of such a gimmicky tax shelter. puring these loopholes allowed us to turn to cut rates. at the time, that made sense, too. while it is critically important to insure that everyone, especially those at the top pay their fair share, 50% top federal tax rate is what we have un
it and we will read it later, i wonder if president obama read through the whole law. the state of the union address he says illegal aliens will not be covered under obamacare, but in the actual law it says they will be covered. i wonder if they did not have the tape about romney's statement on the 47%, what are their other talking points? remember that romney was the governor of massachusetts and 87% of the people in his state were democrats. so he is a man for all the people. he brought out the best from massachusetts. he is not a salesman. president obama is a better speaker ben mitt romney. host: ok, richard we will leave it there. there's a poll on the front page of the new york times -- those are likely voters in the battleground states. some other polls for you. this is also from the new york times in the paper this morning and the front page of the wall street journal -- it's virtually a dead heat between the two candidates. 45% for governor romney in 8%.rida and 4 our topics for all of you this morning, how important are the vice presidential debates? in little rock, arkansas, an in
i want to know where is the democratic budget? i'm told it's by law they suppose to pass a budget. they haven't passed one for three years. what happens, they break the law and get away with it? the second thing is, these companies, these defense companies are suppose to send out notices to employees if there's a big event taking place within 60 days. yet the president tells them do not send those notices out. again, against the law but yet nobody calls him on it. why do we have them there in the first place? can the president say i will break the law and there's no ramification? host: robby mook. guest: look budgets should get passed and we got to figure out the sequestration. the problem is the tea party republicans who came to congress are drawing lines they won't cross and compromise. they refuse to put revenue on the table and they all signed a pledge for grover norquist. they will do anything for tax breaks for millionaires and oil companies and whole host of breaks for corporations. we will not solve this problem until tea party republicans can come to the table. guest:
. in this everybody so there were people in a hotel conference rooms. there were people in law from conference rooms where they could get an internet connection. people working at starbucks where they could get an internet connection, people working at their kitchen tables around town. all of a sudden, around april 1 we start moving into our headquarters finally. this is six weeks away from the announcement or maybe even longer. just this big space, far bigger than this room, about three times the size of this room on the whole floor of a high-rise building in chicago. it was remarkable. we did not have everybody in yet, but we were still getting our servers up. we had phones ringing and people try to answer phones. we had e-mail coming into our e- mail address and did not even have a system to receive e-mail in a real way that. you that. we had mail coming in but we did not have a budget yet. we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate. we had fund-raisers. we had to raise money with this little-known barack obama brand against wh
is going to be on the president of the health care law. from a policy perspective, where are you and what do you think your party offers on healthcare? >> i will start by telling you where i am on that law. i see president obama's health care legislation as adding 32 million people to an already broken system. if you have a broken base and you pour water into it, it is going to shatter. see substantial solutions to pass the system we have to do. the gaps and loopholes and waste and fraud, that is where we need to start. governor romney and congressman ryan want to see what we have today and how we can build upon that. especially so that we are not taxing the american people more than we already are. the fact that the supreme court saw obamacare as a tax is an issue for me as it is for most republicans. i would like to see people work together to create a solution where people have health care. governor romney has never said he does not want every american to have health care. it wants a good solution. he does not want to do anything until he has found the right way to do it. he does not w
in the heart of london which is not even governed by the laws of england, the queen of england has to have special permission to go in there. that is the banking center in the world. there is no limit to the rehab provocation of collateral. that means they are manufacturing money out of medicare. that is why we have a two quadrillion derivative debt in the world. a america is only $16 trillion in the debt. the whole world is bankrupt because of that. what about their debt? congress to bail them out last time because they threaten to have martial law in the streets. host: we are going to go to a tweet. do you think the american dream has been downsized? that is the story -- that is the question this morning. we are watching to see the republican numbers come out. they plan to send their numbers of very sen. here is what about mitt romney. -- here is one about mitt romney. some other news stories from the campaign trail. expectations run high ahead of the single chance to face off. they go head to head this week. c-span will bring that to you live. we have live coverage of the campaign 2012
every dime we used to rescue the banks, and we passed a law, to the end taxpayer-funded wall street bailouts permanently. we passed health care reform, also known as obamacare, because i do care. i do not want insurance companies, jerking you around anymore. i do not suit him -- do not want somebody without health care because they have a pre-existing condition. we repealed "don't ask, don't tell," as i promised him we would. today, he no outstanding soldier, marine, sailor, here man -- airman, none of them will be kicked out of the military because of who they are and who they love. when you think about ohio, and when governor romney said that we should let the auto industry go bankrupt -- we said, we are not going to take your advice. do not boo. vote. we reinvented a diving auto industry that supplies one in eight ohio jobs and has come roaring back to the top of the world. four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our businesses have created more than 5 million new jobs. friday, we found out the unemployment rate has fallen from as high as 10% to as low as 7.8
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